Plants

All of our ecologists are knowledgeable botanists who routinely carry out botanical surveys during a Preliminary Ecological Appraisal (also known as a Phase 1 Habitat Survey). Identifying all of the plants on site helps us to accurately identify the habitats and allows an assessment of the ecological value of a site. Habitat with a high ecological value can be a material consideration when applying for planning permission and it is therefore important to be able to provide evidence to convince the Planning Ecologist that a habitat is indeed of low ecological value – and the plant list is key evidence.

Botanical surveys are also key to identifying habitats that are likely to support protected species such as dormice and to determining whether a hedgerow is ‘important’ as defined by the Hedgerow Regulations (1997). Some rare plants are protected by Law (Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and amendments) and some invasive plants (such as Japanese knotweed) are also subject to the Act.

Early detection of rare or invasive plants can save costly delays to development and our botanists are skilled and experienced at spotting such plants.Considered landscaping of a site post-development can go a long way to mitigating for any loss to biodiversity and can also help to achieve points for a Code for Sustainable Homes assessment. Our ecologists can put together planting lists for a variety of situations as well as providing planting advice that is sensitive to geographic location, protected species on site (such as dormice), type of development and management of the site going forward.

Green Ecology can provide the following services related to plants:

  • Botanical survey
  • Legislation & policy advice
  • Practical solutions for invasive plants
  • Landscaping & planting advice
  • Habitat creation and restoration

For more information about botanical surveys and how we can deliver timely and cost effective solutions to your project please get in touch.

Hedgerow Surveys

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